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The golfer, standing sentinel…

While driving in our neighborhood on a spring day some years ago, a freshly cut tree stump caught my attention. I stopped to examine it more closely. A sad face had been beautifully carved into the stump and under it was written “NO JOB”, a phone number and the name of the artist.

I called the number and the next day I hired Aureo Consalvez, a native of Mauritius and a newcomer to Ontario to work on the grounds staff at the Board of Trade Country Club. I had a plan but I kept it to myself as I knew neither the GM nor the green committee would have approved.

During his first day at work we looked for a suitable tree on which he could practice his artistry. We found a towering white pine behind the 7th green that had blown over during a recent storm. It suited our needs perfectly. We cut off the top and tackled the 12 ft. base back upright again.

Then Aureo went to work. He built a scaffold around the stump and with a small chainsaw proceeded to outline the figure of a man. Next he got out his tools to do the fine trimming. He chipped away patiently as he watched the golfers on the course three-putt, slice, hook and shank, capturing their stern looks in the face of the golfer statue he was creating.

After just four weeks the statue of a golfer was completed and it became unique addition to our landscape. Visitors to the club came to admire the stoic golfer with the stern look. The green staff and I were pleased with the only golfer on our course who never swore and never complained.

Our golfer stood there all summer like a silent guardian overlooking the landscape and the golfers. Lightning did not strike him. He survived the harsh winter wind and cold and was still there when the golfers returned the following spring.

Then one night vandals came and cut him off at the base. The following morning all that remained were his shoes. It was a sad day for all of us. Some golfers even offered money to create another statue but nothing came of it. It became a memory of something beautiful that been destroyed thoughtlessly.

2 Responses to “The golfer, standing sentinel…”

  • Bill Weinstein:

    Thanks for the article. Very well written. I remember the sculpture of the golfer and was one of the saddened members who missed the work of art.
    Too Bad.
    Warmest regards,
    Bill

  • Greg O'Heron:

    Oh yes the statue, I remember him well, I remember the morning after the night he was butchered. I had the pleasure od escorting the CIS team out to the site. Those were the days, the very best of days, you don’t realize at the time but present clarity on comes in future reflection. Thanks Gordon GO